High-flying “story stocks” hit air pockets as credit finally tightens

“Nobody could ever have seen this coming” is the normal comment after sudden share price falls.  And its been earning its money over the past week as “suddenly” share prices of some of the major “story stocks” on the US market have hit air pockets, as the chart shows:

  • Facebook was the biggest “surprise”, falling 20% on Thursday to lose $120bn in value
  • Twitter was another “surprise”, falling 21% on Friday to lose $7bn 
  • Netflix has also lost 15% over the past 16 days, losing $27bn
  • Tesla has lost 20% over the past 6 weeks, losing $13bn

These are quite major falls for stocks which were supposed to be unstoppable in terms of their market advances.

Of course, their supporters could say it was just a healthy correction and a “buying opportunity”.  And they might add that so far, other “story stocks” such as Alphabet, Apple and Amazon are still doing well.  But others might say a paradigm shift is underway, and these sudden shocks are just the early warning that the central banks’ Quantitative Easing bubble is finally starting to burst.

They might have a point, looking at the second set of charts:

  • Twitter stopped being a major growth story as long ago as 2015, since when its user growth has been relatively slow, even going negative in some quarters
  • Facebook stopped showing major growth in active users 18 months ago – and in 2018, it has been flat in N America and losing subscribers in Europe, whilst Asia and the Rest of the World are also heading downwards
  • Tesla, of course, has been a serial disappointment.  Its founder, Elon Musk, was brutally honest when founding the company in 2003, saying it had a 10% chance of success.  Since then, it has mostly failed to meet its production targets.  It was supposed to be making 5000 Tesla 3 cars a week by the end of last year, but according to Bloomberg’s Model 3 tracker, it is currently producing only 2825/week.  Around 0.5 million buyers have paid their $1k deposits and are still waiting for their car – and Tesla needs their cash if its not to run out of money
  • Netflix is another “story stock” now seeing a downturn in subscriber growth.  Yet at its peak it had a market value of $181bn, with net income for this quarter forecast by the company at just $307m.  Like Tesla, it was valued at a higher value than comparable businesses such as Disney, which have had solid earnings streams for decades.

The common factor with all 4 stocks is that they have a great “narrative” or “story”.  Elon Musk has held investors spellbound whilst he told them of unparalleled riches to come from his innovation.  This seemed to be the same with Facebook until the furore arose over the data user scandal with  Cambridge Analytica.  Twitter and Netflix have also had a great “story”, which overcame the need to show real earnings even after years of investment.

THE LIQUIDITY BUBBLES ARE STARTING TO BURST AS CENTRAL BANK STIMULUS SLOWS
In other words, reality seems to be starting to intrude on the “story”, just as it did at the end of the dot-com bubble in 2000, and the US subprime bubble in 2008.  The key, then as now, is the end of the stimulus policies that created the bubbles, as the 3rd set of charts shows:

  • Slowly but surely, the US Federal Reserve is finally raising interest rates back to more normal levels
  • And more importantly, China’s shadow bank lending is declining – H1 was down by $468bn versus 2017

Even the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan have signalled they might finally be about to cut back on the combined $5.75tn of lending, often at negative rates, that they pumped into the markets between 2015 – March 2018.

The issue is simple. All bubbles need more and more air to be pumped into them to keep growing. Once the air stops being added, they start to burst. And for the moment, at least, Facebook, Twitter, Netflix and Tesla are all acting as the proverbial canary in the coal mine, warning that the great $33tn Quantitative Easing bubble may be starting to burst.

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Chemical industry warns of likely global recession in 2017

ACC Nov16bThe chemical industry is the best leading indicator for the global economy, and it is flagging major warning signs about the outlook for 2017.  As the chart above shows, based on American Chemistry Council (ACC) data:

  Since 2009, Capacity Utilisation (CU%) has never returned to the 91.3% averaged between 1987 – 2008
  It hit an all-time low at 77.7% in March 2009 after the financial crisis began
  Despite $27tn of global stimulus lending since then, it was back at 78.8% in September
  Even more worrying is that it has seen a steady decline for the past year, from 81.3% in September 2015

And as the ACC warn:

“Growth in the industry has been nearly flat most of the year thus far”.  

ACC G7 Nov16a

The second chart highlights the position in the G7 countries, responsible for nearly half of global GDP, over the past 12 months.  It shows the change in chemical production, using a 3 month average:

  Canada, the smallest G7 economy, has been stable due to its strong export position, at 6%
  Japan has also been stable at 4%, with its trade balance gaining from the yen’s weakness since September 2012
  France has declined from 5.4% to 3.4%, despite benefiting from the euro’s weakness
  Italy has been broadly stable, also benefiting from the euro’s decline, at 2.1%
  The USA, the world’s largest economy, has fallen steadily from 2.2% to just 0.5%
  Germany, Europe’s largest economy, has seen production fall from 2.4% to a negative 0.2% over the past year
  The UK, the world’s 4th largest economy, has fallen from 3.4% to a negative 2.9%

This adds to the disappointing picture in the BRIC economies, which account for over a fifth of the global economy, as I discussed on Friday.  Brazil has been negative for the past 12 months: Russia has collapsed from 15% to 5%;  India has been the best performer, being stable at around 4.5%; China has slowed further from 4% to 3%.

The industry is generally around 6 months ahead of the global economy, because of its early position in the supply chain. Thus in 2008, it was clear from around March that the world was heading into a major downturn.  The Bear Stearns collapse was effectively the “canary in the coalmine”.  My view remains that the Brexit vote at the end of June marked a similar tipping point, as I warned on 27 June.  And as I noted then:

The global economy is in far worse shape today than in 2008, due to the debt created by the world’s major central banks.”

As in 2008, of course, most commentators are still convinced that everything in the garden is rosy.

I fear, however, that soon they will once again be excusing their mistake, by telling anyone who will listen that “nobody could have seen this downturn coming”.  The reason for their mistake, as in 2008, will simply be that they were looking in the wrong place, by focusing on the positive signals from financial markets.  But these lost their key role of price discovery long ago, due to the vast wave of liquidity provided by stimulus programmes.

Unless we see a rapid recovery in the next few weeks, prudent companies and investors would be well advised to heed the clear warning from chemical markets that global recession is just around the corner.

Oil market speculators profit as central banks hand out free cash

Oil Mar16

Oil markets are entering a very dangerous phase.  Already, many US energy companies have gone bankrupt, having believed that $100/bbl prices would justify their drilling costs.  Now the pain is moving downstream.

The problem is the central banks.  Hedge funds have piled into the oil futures markets since January, betting that there would be lots more free cash from the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank.  They also gambled correctly that the US Federal Reserve and Bank of England would back off the idea of interest rate rises.

Brent Mar16So, once again, markets have lost their role of price discovery, based on the fundamentals of supply and demand. Instead, prices have jumped 50%  in 2 months, as financial speculators have rushed to buy oil in the futures markets:

  • As Reuters noted at the beginning of March, “Hedge funds have switched from a very bearish view on crude oil prices at the end of last year to a much more bullish one
  • The red line in the chart highlights the dramatic shift that has taken place
  • By 1 March, they had created a 445 million barrels net long position – equal to 5 days of total world demand
  • They added 61mbbls in just the first week of March, building their longest position since the summer

This move had nothing to do with the fundamentals of supply and demand, which are still getting worse, not better.

As I describe in the video interview with ICIS deputy news editor, Tom Brown, the rally mirrors what happened a year ago in the SuperBowl rally – when traders put about the story that a fall in the number of US drilling rigs would reduce production.  Of course that didn’t happen, because the rigs are becoming very much more productive.

But the hedge funds did’t care about that – they simply knew there was money to be made as the central banks handed out vast quantities of free cash.

Now the central banks are doing it again.  And so, once again, oil prices have jumped 50% in a matter of weeks, along with prices for other major commodities such as iron ore and copper, as well as Emerging Market equities and bonds. In turn, this will force companies to buy raw materials at today’s unrealistically high prices, as the seasonally strong Q2 period is just around the corner.  Some may even build inventory, fearing higher prices by the summer.

If this happens, and prices collapse again as the hedge funds take their profits, many companies will face the risk of bankruptcy as we head into Q3.  They will be sitting on high prices in a falling market – just as happened in January. Only Q3 could be worse, being seasonally weak, and so it may take a long time to work off high-priced inventory.

We cannot stop the central banks handing out free cash to their friends in the hedge fund industry.  They think high commodity prices are good news, as they might create inflation and reduce the real cost of central bank debt.  All companies and genuine investors can do is to instead avoid taking any positions, long or short.

As experienced poker players say, “If you don’t know who the sucker is at the poker table, then it is probably you”.

WEEKLY MARKET ROUND-UP
My weekly round-up of Benchmark prices since the Great Unwinding began is below, with ICIS pricing comments:
Brent crude oil, down 62%
Naphtha Europe, down 58%. “Petrochemical cracker margins drop off”
Benzene Europe, down 55%. “The upward momentum on crude oil was keeping the market volatile, and perhaps also limiting any spot trading as players waited for clearer direction.”
PTA China, down 42%. “Dips in upstream crude oil and energy prices in the first part of the trading week exerted downward pressure on PTA prices”
HDPE US export, down 35%. “Expectations of tightening supply because of the onset of the plant turnaround season.”
¥:$, down 9%
S&P 500 stock market index, up 5%

New oil price fall is matter of “when”, not “if”, as inventory builds

Oil storage Jun15bFinancial players have become convinced in recent months that the oil price will rise.  And so far, this has been a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Their buying has led to oil being stored all over the world – in tankers floating at sea and in shale oil wells, as well as in storage tanks.

Unsurprisingly, prices have rallied as all this product was being taken off the market.  But whilst it easy to buy oil in an over-supplied market, the buyers now face the more difficult task of trying to resell it at a profit as we move into the seasonally weaker months of Q3.

The chart above from the Wall Street Journal shows how the volume of oil in floating storage more than trebled between January – May, and is still more than twice the earlier level.  The volume comes from traders taking advantage of the difference between current and future prices (the contango) to buy today and sell to hedge funds and other financial buyers at a guaranteed profit in the future.

But Iran has also been storing oil on ships, to release on world markets if sanctions are lifted following a deal on the nuclear issue, perhaps in the next few weeks

In addition, of course, there is the record volume of oil inventory in the US, as I discussed last week.  Plus US shale producers have drilled 3000 wells in preparation to pump up to 1.3mbbls/day of oil once prices have moved higher.

Oil storage Jun15cAnd in Europe, as the second WSJ chart shows, oil storage has hit a record level of 61mbbls.

And finally, recent months have seen strong buying by China to fill its strategic petroleum reserve.  It had decided to raise the reserve to 100 days of normal demand.  But as a Sinopec executive told Reuters back in March this programme will soon be complete.

It clearly makes no sense for prices to rise on such artificial/temporary types of demand, when the International Energy Agency suggests surplus production is currently running at 2mb/day.

The problem is the record amounts of money that have gone into commodity hedge funds.  This has fallen slightly from the $80bn peak seen in 2013, but still stands at $69bn today.  And, of course, $69bn buys a lot more oil today than it did when prices were at $100/bbl in 2013.

These mounting surpluses are making life more and more difficult for producers in Europe and W Africa.  As I noted last year, Nigeria has lost its entire export market to the US, worth 1.3mb/day, and is instead having to send its oil all the way to Asia.  Now N Sea producers are facing the same problem, with tankers carrying the equivalent of a week’s consumption by the UK now heading to Asia instead.

Of course, as the saying goes, “money talks”.  So as long as financial players keep buying in financial markets, oil supplies will keep increasing.  But unused oil can’t keep being held in storage forever.  Eventually the fundamentals of supply/demand balances will cause prices to fall back to historical levels of $30/bbl or lower.

We cannot know what might be the catalyst for this development.  Perhaps it will be a panic over Greece, or an Iranian agreement, or something else entirely.  But barring geopolitical upset, it is not a question of “if”, but of “when”.

 

 

Oil price collapse, US$ rise confirm Great Unwinding underway

GU 15Nov14AStock markets are floating ever higher on an ocean of central bank money printing.  But something else is happening in the real world where we all live and work.  Since August, I have been warning that the Great Unwinding of this policymaker stimulus is now underway.  The chart above highlights how my 2 core forecasts have now been confirmed:

  • Brent Oil prices have fallen nearly 25%, and the IEA expect “downward price pressures could build further in H1 2015” (blue line)
  • The US dollar has rallied 8% versus the world’s major currencies, with the G-20 warning  ”The global economy remains vulnerable to shocks, financial fragility remains” (red)

This also confirms the core argument in Boom, Gloom and the New Normal, which suggested the global economy was entering a New Normal.   $35tn of stimulus hasn’t restored growth to SuperCycle levels, as the IMF has noted.  Instead, the ‘demographic dividend’ that drove the economic SuperCycle has become a ‘demographic deficit’.

The key to the Unwinding is China.  President Xi Jinping simply has to set a new economic course:

  • He inherited the results of the 2009 – 2013 stimulus programme
  • This was based on a ten-fold rise in lending, from $1tn to $10tn
  • The result is that the country now has to pay $1.7tn each year in interest
  • This is more than the entire economies of S Korea, Malaysia or Indonesia

Xi and his colleagues have prepared for this New Normal for 2 years.  As before in times of Crisis (Deng in 1977, Jiang in 1993), they have taken detailed advice from the World Bank.  They know that China has to reverse its economic course.  And the time to make the break with the past is when you start, when people are ready for change.

I will look in more detail at some of the key implications of the Great Unwinding tomorrow and during the rest of this week.

 

WEEKLY MARKET ROUND-UP
The weekly round-up of Benchmark prices since the Great Unwinding began is below, with ICIS pricing comments:

Benzene Europe, down 36%. “ample availability and weak derivative demand were the key drivers for the current downward momentum”
Naphtha Europe, down 29%. “Prices plunged closer to the $600/t mark on low upstream Brent crude oil futures, remaining at a four-year low”
PTA China, down 25%. ”Price increases in the futures market were attributed to buying activity by PTA producers, in line with expected lower operating rates at PTA facilities in the near term.”
Brent crude oil, down 23%
¥:$, down 14%
HDPE US export, flat. “With the chances growing for a US PE price cut, producers may weaken in order to manage inventories with the year-end in mind”
S&P 500 stock market index, up 4%

Boom/Gloom Index tumbles as S&P 500 hits record

Index Sept14aThe stock market used to be a good leading indicator for the economy.  But that was before the central banks decided to manipulate it for their own purposes.  As then US Federal Reserve Chairman boasted 3 years ago on launching their second round of money-printing:

Policies have contributed to a stronger stock market just as they did in March 2009, when we did the last iteration of this. The S&P 500 is up 20%-plus and the Russell 2000, which is about small cap stocks, is up 30%-plus.”

Of course, the Fed launched their QE low-cost money policy with the best of intentions.  They genuinely thought that a higher stock market would boost consumer spending by creating a new ‘wealth effect’, and that this would then encourage companies to invest in new capacity, thus boosting employment.

Unfortunately, the data shows that fewer Americans own stocks than own houses – only 52% versus 65%.  So the impact of higher stock prices hasn’t actually helped to boost spending, particularly as real household incomes remain well below pre-Crisis levels.

Instead we have seen a growing divergence between the performance of the stock market and the wider economy – the opposite of the Fed’s intention.

So the question now is very simple.  Will the economy suddenly start to respond to the Fed’s policy?  That, of course, would be very welcome, if it happened.  Or will the Great Unwinding now underway in oil and currency markets start to impact equity markets as well?

Worryingly, the IeC Boom/Gloom Index is giving us its own answer – and it is not positive.  As the chart above shows:

  • The S&P 500 Index has hit a record 2000 level for the first time (red line)
  • But the Boom/Gloom Index of sentiment actually fell sharply (blue column)
  • It is now bordering levels which have always seen stock market losses in the past

The chemical industry is also, of course, also a good leading indicator.  It tends to pick up around 6 months before the wider economy, and to turn down in advance as well.  And its Q2 downturn was a clear signal that H2 would be more difficult that expected.

Now the the Boom/Gloom Index is reinforcing that message.  Both indicators may be wrong, and the stock market right.  But the blog certainly wouldn’t plan ahead on that basis, if it was still running a major chemical business today.