Global auto market heads for 5% fall as stimulus impact wanes

Top 72016 data highlights one startling statistic about the world’s Top 7 auto markets.  They are 85% of total world sales and as the chart shows, their overall sales growth since 2007 has been entirely due to China:

   China’s sales have risen nearly four-fold since 2007, from 6.3m to 24.2m
   Sales in the other 6 markets were exactly the same in 2016 as in 2007, at 43m

This has been very good news for those who were in China.  Everyone has seen their sales rise – the car companies, the component suppliers and all the service-based industries that supported this fabulous expansion.

There have also been good opportunities in other parts of the world over the period, but also major risks:

   US sales hit a new record in 2016, after a great run since 2009 following GM and Chrysler’s bankruptcy
   The 27-member European Union (EU) has done well since 2013, up nearly a quarter to 14.6m, but is still below 2007′s 15.6m.  (The market peaked back in 1999, when 14.6m cars were sold to the then 15 EU members)
   Japan did well to 2013, but has since fallen to 4.2m; well down on 2004′s peak of 4.8m. (It is back to 1992 levels)
   India set a new record at 2.9m in 2016, double 2007′s level, but fell 19% in December as demonetisation impacted
   Brazil did well till 2012 when sales hit 2.8m, but are now below 2007′s level at 2m
   Russia also soared from 2009, hitting 2.8m in 2012, but has since halved to just 1.4m in 2016

Now global sales are likely heading for a fall.  They would already have been much lower without the support of major stimulus measures.  Governments have been desperate to keep auto sales rising, due to their impact on jobs:

   When China’s sales began to slow in 2015, the sales tax was cut from 10% to 5% for smaller cars with engines below 1.6l – which are mostly produced by Chinese manufacturers.  But now China has raised the tax back to 7.5%, leading the manufacturers’ association to forecast sales growth will fall from 21% in 2016 to just 3% in 2017
   Europe has seen widespread and continuous discounting.  Ford’s European profit was just $259m in 2015: it and Fiat Chrysler made operating margins of less than 1% of sales, and GM continued to lose money.  UK sales have relied on $25.8bn ($28bn) of payments since 2011 for insurance mis-selling, as many claimants used their average £3k compensation as a deposit on a car loan.  VW’s diesel scandal will also have long-term negative impact, given that over half of all European new car sales have been diesel vehicles for the past decade.  Paris, Madrid and Athens have already decided to ban diesel cars completely by 2025.
   The USA has seen discounts reach an average $4k in December, up 20% on 2015.  Leasing and financing deals have also been critical in maintaining auto sales.  Experian data shows 86% of new cars were bought with financing in Q3 2016; the average loan amount is at a record high of $30k, and loan terms average 68 months

Logic therefore suggests the consensus is being extremely optimistic in ignoring today’s increasingly uncertain political background, and assuming global sales will continue to grow in 2017:

   China faces political uncertainty ahead of the critical 19th National Party Congress in Q4.  President Xi is almost certain to be re-nominated for a second 5-year term, but cannot currently rely on maintaining control of the critical Politburo Standing Committee – China’s main decision-making body.
   Europe also faces major political uncertainty, with elections due in The Netherlands, France and Germany – and possibly Italy.  In addition, the UK is highly likely to table its decision to leave the EU in the next few weeks.
   In the US, every two-term Presidency for 100 years has been followed by recession.  President Trump is highly likely to take difficult decisions this year, before next year’s mid-term elections and his own re-election bid in 2020

Another key issue is the impact of falling prices for used cars.  Their volumes are already increasing as all the new cars sold in recent years come back for resale.  China’s Auto Dealer Association expects used car sales to equal those for new cars by 2020, whilst Barclays has warned that US new car “prime and subprime net loss rates are close to multi-year highs because of softening used car values.” 

Then there is the growing impact of taxi services such as Uber and Did, and the rise of car-sharing business models and self-driving cars.  Most Americans, after all, waste a week of their lives in traffic jams each year, and many auto manufacturers are now introducing more service-driven business models as BMW have argued:

“Our core business in the ’70s was selling cars; in the ’80s, late ’70s came the great innovation of leasing and financing.  Now you can pay per use of a car.  It’s like the music industry.  You used to have to buy an album, now you can pay per play.” 

It is not yet clear how bad the downturn will be.  But it would seem prudent to plan for at least a 5% global decline this year, given today’s rising levels of uncertainty and global interest rates.  It will be too late to panic later in the year, once the detail of the downturn has become more obvious.

Chemical industry flags rising risk of global recession in 2017, with Trump set to “clear the decks” at the start of his first term

ACC Dec16The chemical industry is the best leading indicator that we have for the global economy.  It has an excellent correlation with IMF data, and also benefits from the fact it has no “political bias”.  It simply tells us what is happening in real-time in the world’s 3rd largest industry.

Sadly, the news is not good.

As the chart shows, based on the latest American Chemistry Council data, Capacity Utilisation (CU%) fell to just 78.4% in October.  This is only just above the lowest reading ever seen, of 77% at the bottom of the sub-prime crisis in March 2009. The pattern is also worryingly familiar:

  Then the CU% peaked in May 2007 at 95.1%, before declining to 88% by October 2008, and collapsing to 77%
  This time, the CU% peaked at 80.7% in December 2015 and has been falling ever since, month by month
  Given that the industry is normally around 8 – 12 months ahead of the wider economy, due to its early position in the supply chain, this means it is highly likely that the global economy will move into recession during 2017

Of course, nobody ever wants to forecast recession.  And there are always plenty of reasons why something might be “different this time”.  But it would certainly seem prudent for companies and investors to develop a Recession Scenario for their business for 2017. given the track record of the CU% indicator.

Indeed, there are a number of reasons to suggest that any recession might be severe.  Bill White, the only central banker to warn of the subprime crisis, warned in January that “the world faces wave of epic debt defaults“, and then added in September that:

The global situation we face today is arguably more fraught with danger than was the case when the crisis first began. By encouraging still more credit and debt expansion, monetary policy has ‘‘dug the hole deeper.’’…In practice, ultraeasy policy has not stimulated aggregate demand to the degree expected but has had other unexpected consequences.  Not least, it poses a threat to financial stability and to potential growth going forward….the fundamental problem is not inadequate liquidity but excessive debt and possible insolvencies. The policy stakes are now very high.”

  When White spoke, the implications of the UK’s Brexit vote were still only just beginning to be recognised
  Since then, US President-elect Donald Trump has announced his 100-Day Plan to reshape America’s world role
  Major uncertainty is building in Europe with Italy’s referendum plus Dutch, French and German elections
  India’s economy is weakening as the currency reforms have taken 86% of its cash out of circulation
  Plus, there are ever-present risks from China’s housing bubble, and the potential for a trade war with the USA

Of course, many of the same people who said that Brexit would never happen, and that Trump would never win, are now lining up to tell us everything will still be the same in the end.  But they should really have very little credibility.

What many investors also seem to be forgetting is that Trump has been a long-time CEO.  And new CEOs normally write-off everything in their first year of office.  This gives them the double bonus of being able to (a) blame the previous CEO and (b) then take credit for any improvement.

As Trump would no doubt like a second term of office from 2021, he has every incentive to “clear the decks” in 2017.

 

Chemical industry warns of likely global recession in 2017

ACC Nov16bThe chemical industry is the best leading indicator for the global economy, and it is flagging major warning signs about the outlook for 2017.  As the chart above shows, based on American Chemistry Council (ACC) data:

  Since 2009, Capacity Utilisation (CU%) has never returned to the 91.3% averaged between 1987 – 2008
  It hit an all-time low at 77.7% in March 2009 after the financial crisis began
  Despite $27tn of global stimulus lending since then, it was back at 78.8% in September
  Even more worrying is that it has seen a steady decline for the past year, from 81.3% in September 2015

And as the ACC warn:

“Growth in the industry has been nearly flat most of the year thus far”.  

ACC G7 Nov16a

The second chart highlights the position in the G7 countries, responsible for nearly half of global GDP, over the past 12 months.  It shows the change in chemical production, using a 3 month average:

  Canada, the smallest G7 economy, has been stable due to its strong export position, at 6%
  Japan has also been stable at 4%, with its trade balance gaining from the yen’s weakness since September 2012
  France has declined from 5.4% to 3.4%, despite benefiting from the euro’s weakness
  Italy has been broadly stable, also benefiting from the euro’s decline, at 2.1%
  The USA, the world’s largest economy, has fallen steadily from 2.2% to just 0.5%
  Germany, Europe’s largest economy, has seen production fall from 2.4% to a negative 0.2% over the past year
  The UK, the world’s 4th largest economy, has fallen from 3.4% to a negative 2.9%

This adds to the disappointing picture in the BRIC economies, which account for over a fifth of the global economy, as I discussed on Friday.  Brazil has been negative for the past 12 months: Russia has collapsed from 15% to 5%;  India has been the best performer, being stable at around 4.5%; China has slowed further from 4% to 3%.

The industry is generally around 6 months ahead of the global economy, because of its early position in the supply chain. Thus in 2008, it was clear from around March that the world was heading into a major downturn.  The Bear Stearns collapse was effectively the “canary in the coalmine”.  My view remains that the Brexit vote at the end of June marked a similar tipping point, as I warned on 27 June.  And as I noted then:

The global economy is in far worse shape today than in 2008, due to the debt created by the world’s major central banks.”

As in 2008, of course, most commentators are still convinced that everything in the garden is rosy.

I fear, however, that soon they will once again be excusing their mistake, by telling anyone who will listen that “nobody could have seen this downturn coming”.  The reason for their mistake, as in 2008, will simply be that they were looking in the wrong place, by focusing on the positive signals from financial markets.  But these lost their key role of price discovery long ago, due to the vast wave of liquidity provided by stimulus programmes.

Unless we see a rapid recovery in the next few weeks, prudent companies and investors would be well advised to heed the clear warning from chemical markets that global recession is just around the corner.

Will 2014 be a repeat of 2008, but worse?

Index Jul14

Will 2014 turn out to be a repeat of 2008 for the US economy?

6 years ago, after all, not a single mainstream forecaster – including the IMF and World Bank – was forecasting a recession.  Even in September 2008, the consensus was still confident about the economic outlook.  Yet the National Bureau for Economic Research later confirmed the official start of the recession as being December 2007.

Interestingly, a number of the same people who were wary of the outlook in 2008 are equally wary today.  Thus Nobel Prize-winner Robert Shiller warned last week:

I am definitely concerned. When was [the cyclically adjusted P/E ratio or CAPE] higher than it is now? I can tell you: 1929, 2000 and 2007. … We don’t know what it’s going to do. There could be a massive crash, like we saw in 2000 and 2007, the last two times it looked like this. But I don’t know. … One thing though, I don’t know how many people look at plots of the market. If you just look at a plot of one of the major averages in the U.S., you’ll see what look like three peaks – 2000, 2007 and now – it just looks to me like a peak. I’m not saying it is. I would think that there are people thinking that way – it’s gone way up since 2009. It’s likely to turn down again, just like it did the last two times.”

And, of course, there is the fact that Q1 GDP was a negative 2.9%.  Of course, all the professional optimists immediately told us that this was just due to bad weather, and we would see an immediate and sustained recovery.  They may turn out to be right, of course.  But it seems many forecasts are now quietly being revised down..

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS, the central bankers’ bank) has also warned explicitly of the dangers for the global economy:

“Obviously, market participants are pricing in hardly any risks….Financial markets are euphoric, but progress in strengthening banks’ balance sheets has been uneven and private debt keeps growing. Macroeconomic policy has little room for manoeuvre to deal with any untoward surprises that might be sprung, including a normal recession.”

The BIS issued similar warnings in July 2007 and July 2008 which were, as now, mostly ignored.

The key issue is complacency.  Markets believe that central banks would never again make the mistake of allowing a Lehman Brothers to go bankrupt.  Therefore they believe that it is perfectly safe to chase stock prices higher and higher.  As the above chart of the IeC Boom/Gloom Index shows:

  • The US S&P 500 Index is making new highs month by month, despite bad news on the real economy (red line)
  • The key is the liquidity programmes from the US, Europe and Japan, which provide free cash to investors
  • But the Index itself seems likely to have peaked in March (blue column)

It is also not hard to identify a catalyst for a future panic as investors insist on continuing to wear their rose-tinted spectacles.  They seem totally unaware of the massive potential downside that could be inflicted on an over-leveraged global economy by the unwinding now underway of China’s ‘collateral trade’.

The reason is they have completely failed to understand that China has abruptly changed economic course under its new leadership.  President Xi and Premier Li know only too well that disaster could follow if they continue with the old policies of stimulus-led growth.  Thus on a tour of central China last week, premier Li brushed aside concerns from senior province governors that:

The aluminum, coal and steel sectors are still suffering heavy losses. … Lending rates, especially for smaller businesses, have grown by at least 20% on average,” and that ”footwear and textile exporters are struggling with weak foreign demand”.

This is a major development in the world’s second largest economy.  But nobody talks about it, or its possible consequences.

Maybe Shiller is wrong to be worried.  Maybe the BIS is also wrong.  But they were right before when everyone else was wrong.  And if they are right again, then as the BIS has also warned, central banks now “have little room for manoeuvre to deal with any untoward surprise”.

 

WEEKLY MARKET ROUND-UP
The blog’s weekly round-up of Benchmark price movements since January 2014 is below, with ICIS pricing comments:
PTA China, flat 0%. “Buying interest for higher-priced cargoes were curbed by prevailing weak downstream demand”
US$: yen, down 3%
Brent crude oil, up 2%
Benzene, Europe, up 6%. “Several players in Europe are uncertain whether prices are sustainable at current levels
Naphtha Europe,
up 6%. “Europe is structurally long on naphtha and has to export to petrochemical markets in Asia and the gasoline sector in the US”
S&P 500
stock market index, up 8%
HDPE US
export, up 7%. “International buyers are not interested in building inventory at high prices”

Nobody realised the BabyBoom had happened till long after it finished

BabyBoom Nov13Milton Friedman received a Nobel Prize for economics in 1976, partly on the basis of his analysis that ‘inflation is everywhere and always a monetary phenomenon’.  It sounds an appealing insight, but of course it is wrong.  The reason is that it confuses cause and effect.

The above chart presents a different view, highlighting the true cause of inflation as being a surplus of demand relative to supply.  In turn, this explains why we now face the prospect of deflation:

  • Logic suggests that the true cause of inflation must be excess demand compared to potential supply
  • This is what began to happen as the BabyBoomers began to create increased demand as they grew up
  • Supply was, of course, limited due to the effect of World War 2 and the small size of the inter-War generation
  • This growth can be seen in the blue columns, as the Boomers grew up and began to reach their Wealth Creator years (25-54 years)
  • Thus whilst nominal GDP was rising all the time (red line), so were inflation and interest rates on the US Treasury 10 Year bond (black)

It is of course quite understandable that Friedman should have come to his conclusion, and that the Nobel Committee should award their Prize.  Historical data on births was extremely limited at that point, even in the wealthy G7 economies.  As the blog found when writing chapter 1 of Boom, Gloom and the New Normal, annual reporting of Italian data only began in 1921 and US data itself only in 1909.

Equally, whilst it is now commonplace to describe the US Boomer period as being from 1946-1964, nobody realised it at the time.  Web research suggests the word was only first used in this context as late as 1977.  Certainly the blog’s 1973 edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) does not reference the word, whilst the online OED gives no reference for first use.

Clearly one cannot blame Friedman, or the Nobel committee, for failing to recognise the critical importance of something of which nobody was then aware.  However, with the advantage of hindsight, we can now easily see that demographics was the critical reason for the rise in inflation that Friedman observed.  Similarly, the chart shows how the story has developed since then:

  • The good news was that the average US Boomer (born 1955) reached their Wealth Creator years in 1980
  • Unsurprisingly at this point, inflation began to fall as supply caught up with demand
  • The Wealth Creator wave then came to its full force, as Boomers from across the Western world reached this period of their lives
  • It created an unique period of constant growth over 25 years, and introduced the concept of globalisation
  • But then, due to the miracle of increased life expectancy, the Boomers didn’t simply die as their ancestors had usually done
  • Western life expectancy, just 46 years in 1900, and still only 66 in 1950, has now reached around 80 years
  • This New Old 55+ generation has never been alive in such numbers before, and will soon be 40%+ of Western adult populations

Unfortunately, misled by Friedman’s analysis, policymakers have assumed for the past decade that monetary policy can restore growth and inflation.  Firstly they boosted the US subprime boom, and since 2009 they have spent vast sums (nearly half of global GDP) in a fruitless effort to turn back the demographic tide.

But any rational and impartial observer can see they are wrong, and that we are instead entering a New Normal.  What this will mean for the economy is unknown, as there is no precedent to guide us.

Equally, it is only now, thanks to books like ‘Boom, Gloom and the New Normal’, that the link between demographics and economic performance is becoming clear for the first time.  Until recently, most people thought of older people as simply being a market for health care and walking sticks.  Like Friedman, they had simply not realised the now increasingly obvious fact, that demographics drive demand.

Ethylene demand weak as eurozone flirts with recession and deflation

C2 OR Nov13So this is as good as it gets in 2013.  That seems to be the sad conclusion from analysis of Q3 operating rate (OR%) data for Europe’s crackers.  Actual Q3 OR% inched up to 81%, which was slightly better than 2012′s 80% rate and 2009′s 79% rate.  But its a very long way from the 90%+ level that used to be considered ‘normal’.

Equally, as the chart shows, overall performance January – September was worse:

  • 2013 OR% so far has been just 79% (red square)
  • This was only just above 2009′s 77% (green)
  • Total ethylene volume so far this year is 14.1MT, just 23kt above 2009 levels

We already know that Q4 will see no recovery.  Dow have announced the temporary closure of their Tarragona cracker in Spain from 1 December because of “challenging market conditions and an unclear demand picture”.  Whilst ICIS polymer expert Linda Naylor noted “this is not the end of the year that many players had envisaged”.

It thus appears markets are indeed following the path forecast by the blog at the beginning of Q4:

  • “Base chemical demand has broadly fallen from peak levels in Q3 
  • “Most chemical buyers built inventory in Sept. because they thought Syrian issues would take oil prices higher
  • “Wiser counsels prevailed over Syria, however, but buyers have no need to buy further volumes in October
  • “November is also likely to be weak as Q3 inventory is worked down
  • “December will see the usual low volumes, as everyone looks to de-stock inventory into year-end”

The other worry is that the Eurozone seems to be slipping back into recession, whilst deflation is looming.  2014 could be a very tricky period indeed.